What I listened to today

Your 'hot spot' for all classical music subjects. Non-classical music subjects are to be posted in the Corner Pub.

Moderators: Lance, Corlyss_D

Post Reply
maestrob
Posts: 11306
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 11:30 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Tue May 11, 2021 9:11 am

Image

Today's opera is Richard Strauss's Der Rosenkavalier, with the great Regine Crespin, the Australian mezzo Yvonne Minton as Octavian, and Helen Donath as Sophie, all led by George Solti with the Vienna Philharmonic. The part of the Italian Tenor is sung by none other than Luciano Pavarotti. There is still none better on CD than this extraordinary recording, released originally in 1968 on four LPs in a silver covered box from London/Decca.

Having conducted both scenes multiple times in Carnegie Hall, I must attest that there is no more sublime singing in the world than either the Rose Presentation scene or the final trio & duet in this recording. Can there be a more heart-wrenching moment in XXth century opera than Regine Crespin's "In Gottes Namen!" as Octavian & Sophie gaze into each other's eyes?

It should be noted that while Herbert von Karajan allows the traditional fermata on the high C in the Presentation of the Rose scene in his famous recording with Elizabeth Schwarzkopf (the soundtrack for the film release), Solti conducts the score as written with no fermata for Sophie.

Rather than write my own lengthy review, I'll post here one better-written from Amazon that I completely agree with:

The Finest of the Der Rosenkavaliers

Reviewed in the United States on January 17, 2009 (by The Cultural Observer)

There are a few recordings of Strauss where the singing, the conducting, the orchestra, and all other elements of the production and engineering work together to create a recording that is definitive across all standards. This is one such recording, and even as great and brilliant Rosenkavaliers by eminent conductors like Carlos Kleiber, Bernard Haitink and Christian Thielemann come with their own sets of strengths, Solti still trumps them all in a reading of the opera that not only sets the tone for the music but also for Strauss and Hofmannsthal's delightful Viennese drama. More so than Karajan and Erich Kleiber, Solti sets the music on a kind of propulsion and pulse that never flags, allowing the multiple scenes that usually substitute well for melatonin to capture the listener's attention.

Solti himself once consulted Strauss on the ideal baton technique for this opera, and the composer remarked as a matter of fact that one should look no further than the text to find the rhythmic pulse on which this Viennese clock runs. Solti took this to heart and produces a reading of the Straussian score that is clearly intertwined into the humor and comedy of the text. It is not nearly as indulgent as Karajan's classic Philharmonia interpretation, but this is for the better. The exchanges during the more placid and contemplative episodes of the opera are paced so naturally that any student of German can tune his ears to the sometimes witty, sometimes philosophical, and oftentimes intimate gabfest. In keeping with the majority of the work in his Straussian operas, Solti conducts this opera with the Vienna Philharmonic. The orchestra's assets have never been put in greater display than in this opera where the gossamer strings, the mellifluously dovetailed woodwinds, and the burnished, bronzen brass sections are balanced so create a perfect sound picture of the bygone Viennese epoch.

The cast couldn't be bettered. While Elisabeth Schwarzkopf and Maria Reining have been passed down by history as the definitive Marschallins, I would say that Regine Crespin betters them both by combining a naturally regal, feminine, beautiful, and sympathetic tone with a sense of expression that is always sensitive to the text without overtly focusing on too many details. This is a Marschallin of poise and elegance, of wisdom and refinement. Passionate and funny in Act I, she comes to her own in Act III and creates a portrait of the character that is described by a graciousness unparalleled by Schwarzkopf's cool interpretation. All the wisdom of the Marschallin in the first Act is played to a tee, with that deep and contemplative scene about time never sung better as it is in this recording. Only Reining could equal Crespin in her assumption of the part, and the French soprano betters her due to her security of voice. Crespin's Marschallin was thankfully captured at the prime of her instrument, producing the most sonorous sounds that truly define the grace and elegance of the Princess von Wurdenburg. A class act, if there were any other.

Yvonne Minton plays the Count Octavian di Rofrano in this recording. While many listeners consider Christa Ludwig to be the ultimate German mezzo, the Australian singer Minton in a way betters Ludwig's assumption by creating a count more boyish and more alive in comparison to the former's Octavian. Ludwig was never particularly fond of the role either, and in the end, even if her vocalism is memorable, Minton creates a character that is more alive, more youthful and vibrant, and more in keeping with the qualities of a callow youth in love. Along with Helen Donath's gorgeous and unparalleled bell-like Sophie, Minton sings the finest presentation of the Rose on disc. The glorious, lush orchestral backdrop is simply perfect and creates the ideal foil for these two talented singers to soar in one of the most beautiful scenes in the opera. But ultimate doesn't get better than when the two singers are joined by Crespin's Marschallin in what must be the best closing trio in recordings--sung with refulgent tone and intimately expressed to end a most memorable recording.

Manfred Jungwirth is delightful and vocally resplendent as Ochs, and he creates a dumb, funny, and comic relief of a character that plays into the irony of the opera. Luciano Pavarotti is perfect as the Italian tenor, and the rest of the cast rounds out what I deem as the finest Rosenkavalier of all time.

https://smile.amazon.com/Strauss-Rosenk ... geNumber=1

maestrob
Posts: 11306
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 11:30 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Mon May 17, 2021 10:34 am

Martinu's chamber music has received few recordings, and his sprightly Violin Sonata III none at all by any major artist. While browsing the contents of the Russian Legends box, I came across a marvelous live performance by David Oistrakh and pianist Frida Bauer recorded in 1964. Here it is on youtube:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JUXFauzV0wA

maestrob
Posts: 11306
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 11:30 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Mon May 17, 2021 1:30 pm

Liapunov's 12 Transcendental Etudes were inspired by, of course, Liszt's great set. Here they are performed by pianist Vincenzo Maltempo on youtube:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UAT933QsVFs

Rach3
Posts: 3695
Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2018 9:17 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Fri May 21, 2021 5:54 pm

Dvorak's String Quartet No.10,Op.51, Janacek Quartet, 1957 studio recording, now apparently
UMG/DGG :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5yGzooHnoI

Dvorak never fails to impress.

Wallingford
Posts: 4665
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 3:31 pm
Location: Brush, Colorado

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Wallingford » Sat May 22, 2021 11:12 pm

Tonight (& next few nights) will be devoted to hearing old Seattle Symphony/Gerard Schwarz concert broadcast dubs I've stored on my laptop--

Kodaly's Hary Janos Suite
Mozart's Symphony #19
Vaughan Williams' Tuba Concerto, with the SSO's then-resident tubist, Christopher Olka. Tomorrow I'll be hearing the same forces in Samuel Jones' Tuba Concerto.
Good music is that which falls upon the ear with ease, and quits the memory with difficulty.
--Sir Thomas Beecham

Wallingford
Posts: 4665
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 3:31 pm
Location: Brush, Colorado

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Wallingford » Sat May 22, 2021 11:18 pm

I likely didn't mention it but six weeks ago I again heard the Goldberg Variations, Gould 1.
Good music is that which falls upon the ear with ease, and quits the memory with difficulty.
--Sir Thomas Beecham

maestrob
Posts: 11306
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 11:30 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Sun May 23, 2021 11:55 am

Rach3 wrote:
Fri May 21, 2021 5:54 pm
Dvorak's String Quartet No.10,Op.51, Janacek Quartet, 1957 studio recording, now apparently
UMG/DGG :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5yGzooHnoI

Dvorak never fails to impress.
Am totally impressed with the 9cd box of Dvorak Quartets with the Prague Quartet on DGG recorded in the 1970s.

Rach3
Posts: 3695
Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2018 9:17 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Sun May 23, 2021 1:10 pm

Shostakovich String Quartets Nos.13,14,15, recordings on YT by the Borodin Quartet.

Whew, hear only once in a great while, but worth the effort.

Rach3
Posts: 3695
Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2018 9:17 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Mon May 24, 2021 9:32 am

Rach3 wrote:
Sun May 23, 2021 1:10 pm
Shostakovich String Quartets Nos.13,14,15, recordings on YT by the Borodin Quartet.
Whew, hear only once in a great while, but worth the effort.
Per a YT comment : " He told the violist Fyodor Druzhinin that the first movement of his Fifteenth Quartet should be played ‘so that flies drop dead in mid-air, and the audience start leaving the hall from sheer boredom’."

maestrob
Posts: 11306
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 11:30 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Mon May 24, 2021 2:43 pm

Been absorbing Eric Heidsieck's Beethoven sonata cycle with consistent respect for his good taste and fine musicianship. Each sonata has something to say without any showmanship or distortion, yet you always know who's playing.

Heidsieck studied with Beethoven specialist Wilhelm Kempff, making his recording debut in 1957 with a stunning ly mature Op. 106 and never looked back. He redid that one in stereo, and was the first French pianist to record a complete cycle.

Rehearing the first stereo CD in this wonderfully restored Erato box of his complete recordings makes for immensely rewarding listening.

Sonatas 1, 5, 6, 7, and 22, recorded 1967, 8, 9.

Rach3
Posts: 3695
Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2018 9:17 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Tue May 25, 2021 11:16 am

23-year old pianist Rian deWaal live at the Concertgebouw Jan.4,1981, playing Beethoven, Chopin,Liszt,Loevendie,Godowsky,Rachmaninoff:

https://www.nporadio4.nl/concerten/1459 ... an-de-waal

He died of cancer at age 53 in 2011.RIP.

maestrob
Posts: 11306
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 11:30 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Tue May 25, 2021 12:02 pm

Rach3 wrote:
Tue May 25, 2021 11:16 am
23-year old pianist Rian deWaal live at the Concertgebouw Jan.4,1981, playing Beethoven, Chopin,Liszt,Loevendie,Godowsky,Rachmaninoff:

https://www.nporadio4.nl/concerten/1459 ... an-de-waal

He died of cancer at age 53 in 2011.RIP.
Thanks Rach3. I should be able to get to this next week when my new computer arrives.

Rach3
Posts: 3695
Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2018 9:17 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Tue May 25, 2021 5:29 pm

Rach3 wrote:
Tue May 25, 2021 11:16 am
23-year old pianist Rian deWaal live at the Concertgebouw Jan.4,1981, playing Beethoven, Chopin,Liszt,Loevendie,Godowsky,Rachmaninoff:

https://www.nporadio4.nl/concerten/1459 ... an-de-waal

He died of cancer at age 53 in 2011.RIP.

Perhaps not “ zal “, but a wonderful sweep and “swagger “ in the Chopin Polonaise. Excellent elsewhere.No strain in the Godowsky , the “ sunset “ in the Liszt a fiery one.

maestrob
Posts: 11306
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 11:30 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Tue May 25, 2021 9:39 pm

Sitting entranced by Bernstein's second recording (1975) of Mahler's sublime Symphony of a Thousand filmed by Unitel in Vienna before the renovation, with perfect microphone placement that captures the wonderful acoustic surrounding the Vienna forces. Originally issued by Pioneer on deluxe 12 inch video disks, it languished in the vaults until it finally surfaced on DVD decades later.

Bernstein was still at the peak of his interpretive powers then, and you simply lose track of the fact that this was recorded 46 years ago. Each soloist is also at their best in a cast that includes Edda Moser, Judith Blegen, Gerti Zeumer, Ingrid Meyr, Agnes Baltsa, Kenneth Riegel, Hermann Prey and Jose Van Dam. IMHO this magnificent performance was not equalled until Nezet-Seguin's 100th Anniversary presentation in Philadelphia's Kimmel Center.

Wallingford
Posts: 4665
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 3:31 pm
Location: Brush, Colorado

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Wallingford » Wed May 26, 2021 7:45 pm

Beethoven's "Elegy on the Death of a Poodle" (That's what it translates to.)

Three recordings....it's to take seriously or not seriously. Pity the 'net's got no translation.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4qWE51cuwFk
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7kkm5Gkp4Vw
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oqxJLAWMCmg
Good music is that which falls upon the ear with ease, and quits the memory with difficulty.
--Sir Thomas Beecham

Rach3
Posts: 3695
Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2018 9:17 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Wed May 26, 2021 8:03 pm

Roberto Gerhard’s Piano Concerto.

I have a recording of his Violin Conceto, which I relly enjoy, thus ventured a first hearing of his PC. Probably will not acquire a recording, but certainly was worth a hearing, perhaps a couple, a striking work with a terrifying score.

Roberto Gerhard (1896 - 1970) - Piano Concerto (1951)

Geoffrey Tozer, piano
BBC Symphony Orchestra, Matthias Bamert (1997)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IffBqrtuGu0 (audio with score )

Tozer was a wonderful pianist. Sad tale,unfortunately.

Wallingford
Posts: 4665
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 3:31 pm
Location: Brush, Colorado

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Wallingford » Thu May 27, 2021 7:45 pm

A few days ago I put on side three of the 50s mono Columbia complete works of Webern set. It includes the 6 Bagatelles, Op. 9; 5 Pieces Op. 10; 3 Small Pieces Op.11; sets of 4 Songs, Opp. 12 & 13; and the 6 Songs, Op. 14.

I only purchased the set, three years ago at a college library sale, because the whole set only was a dollar, and the discs were still quite listenable (VG shape).
Good music is that which falls upon the ear with ease, and quits the memory with difficulty.
--Sir Thomas Beecham

Wallingford
Posts: 4665
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 3:31 pm
Location: Brush, Colorado

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Wallingford » Fri May 28, 2021 5:48 pm

Tchaikovsky's Swan Lake suite (Boult)
Grofe's Mississippi Suite (debut recording by Paul Whiteman)
Beethoven's Hammerklavier Sonata (Serkin)
Debussy's La Mer (Ormandy 3--RCA stereo era)
Chopin's Ballades (Frankl)
Tchaikovsky's Pathetique (Stokowski 2--w/LAPO)
Good music is that which falls upon the ear with ease, and quits the memory with difficulty.
--Sir Thomas Beecham

Wallingford
Posts: 4665
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 3:31 pm
Location: Brush, Colorado

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Wallingford » Sat May 29, 2021 4:05 pm

Stravinsky's Les noces (Craft 1)
Schubert's second set of Impromptus (Schnabel)

...and this Beecham compilation:https://www.discogs.com/Sir-Thomas-Beec ... se/4552804
Good music is that which falls upon the ear with ease, and quits the memory with difficulty.
--Sir Thomas Beecham

maestrob
Posts: 11306
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 11:30 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Sat May 29, 2021 6:20 pm

Wallingford wrote:
Sat May 29, 2021 4:05 pm
Stravinsky's Les noces (Craft 1)
Schubert's second set of Impromptus (Schnabel)

...and this Beecham compilation:https://www.discogs.com/Sir-Thomas-Beec ... se/4552804
I'll go for the Schnabel and the Beecham but Les Noces has never been a work I've connected with for some reason. I'm sure it's my fault of course.

Wallingford
Posts: 4665
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 3:31 pm
Location: Brush, Colorado

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Wallingford » Sat May 29, 2021 8:51 pm

maestrob wrote:
Sat May 29, 2021 6:20 pm
Wallingford wrote:
Sat May 29, 2021 4:05 pm
Stravinsky's Les noces (Craft 1)
Schubert's second set of Impromptus (Schnabel)

...and this Beecham compilation:https://www.discogs.com/Sir-Thomas-Beec ... se/4552804
I'll go for the Schnabel and the Beecham but Les Noces has never been a work I've connected with for some reason. I'm sure it's my fault of course.
Have youheard it sung in the original Russian?

I never liked the composer's own performances (both in English) and I briefly had Boulez' first disc, in French, as was Ansermet's (the man who premiered it). None measure up to Craft's first recording, in Russian, showing it as the masterwork it is.

I bracket this along with Petrushka as my all-time favorite Stravinsky work.
Good music is that which falls upon the ear with ease, and quits the memory with difficulty.
--Sir Thomas Beecham

Rach3
Posts: 3695
Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2018 9:17 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Mon May 31, 2021 9:14 am

Villa-Lobos’ 8th and 9th String Quartets.

I am a big V-L fan , but was not familiar with any of his 16 Quartets, my first hearing here of his 8th and 9th, seemingly more disciplined works than some of his works, and quite technical tour de forces with, however, impressive slow movs. Quartetto Latinoamericano recordings of several years ago, Naxos/Dorian cd:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2RM8lLPxh4Q

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXyJv0hb5j0

Will need to re-hear, may consider a recording.

maestrob
Posts: 11306
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 11:30 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Mon May 31, 2021 9:42 am

Rach3 wrote:
Mon May 31, 2021 9:14 am
Villa-Lobos’ 8th and 9th String Quartets.

I am a big V-L fan , but was not familiar with any of his 16 Quartets, my first hearing here of his 8th and 9th, seemingly more disciplined works than some of his works, and quite technical tour de forces with, however, impressive slow movs. Quartetto Latinoamericano recordings of several years ago, Naxos/Dorian cd:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2RM8lLPxh4Q

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXyJv0hb5j0

Will need to re-hear, may consider a recording.
I own those and haven't heard them for quite a while. Thanks for the reminder. Felt quite drawn to them when I first heard them. Very rewarding listening.

Enjoy the journey.

Rach3
Posts: 3695
Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2018 9:17 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Tue Jun 01, 2021 9:08 am

Vikingur Olafsson's DGG cd of Philip Glass piano Etudes , also at YT now:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1P0SW0V ... x6&index=1

maestrob
Posts: 11306
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 11:30 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Tue Jun 01, 2021 10:03 am

Rach3 wrote:
Tue Jun 01, 2021 9:08 am
Vikingur Olafsson's DGG cd of Philip Glass piano Etudes , also at YT now:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1P0SW0V ... x6&index=1
Olafsson's Bach CD was a major release, and I've had my eye on the Glass, but haven't heard it yet. Not sure if I'll sit through it all in one session, but will give it a try. Thanks for the reminder.

Rach3
Posts: 3695
Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2018 9:17 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Wed Jun 02, 2021 9:19 am

Esa-Pekka Salonen's Violin Concerto,again, Leila Josefowicz' DGG recording:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9jtnxNz ... bGBhVozV3c

Dont care for his Piano Concerto, but the VC is a fine work, to my ear.

Wallingford
Posts: 4665
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 3:31 pm
Location: Brush, Colorado

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Wallingford » Wed Jun 02, 2021 10:48 am

Mozart's 'Haffner' Symphony (Brico)
Beethoven's Fourth (Ansermet)
Svendsen's Second (Gruner-Hegge)
Milhaud's First Piano Concerto (Entremont/Milhaud)
Satie's Socrates (Leibowitz)
Munch conducting Wagner excerpts
...and side two of a '76 RCA disc, Songs America Loves Best, by Sherrill Milnes
Good music is that which falls upon the ear with ease, and quits the memory with difficulty.
--Sir Thomas Beecham

maestrob
Posts: 11306
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 11:30 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Wed Jun 02, 2021 1:08 pm

Image

Been glued to this amazingly well-restored box of Russian recordings by Kirill Kondrashin, arguably Russia's answer to the West's Arturo Toscanini. Konrdashin was the only Soviet-sponsored conductor 9even before he defected in 1978) to have a major career on both sides of the Iron Curtain. Many will remember him as the conductor who led Van Cliburn to victory as the first American to win the Tchaikovsky Competition, but not so many as the conductor who led Martha Argerich in her scintillating digital recording of the same concerto. He even managed to record the first stereo LP made by the reconstituted NBC Symphony, renamed the RCA Symphony for the first "New Orthophonic" stereo recording of Khachaturian, Kabalevsky & Tchaikovsky in 1958.

Nevertheless, Kondrashin's major legacy was recorded in Russia, including a cycle of the non-religious Mahler Symphonies (I, III, IV, V, VI, VII, IX and the Adagio from X), as well as a cycle of Shostakovich (except XV, which was premiered by the composer's son, Maxim), and this box contains many gems from that repertoire. Among them is the most explosive interpretation I've ever heard of Paul Hindemith's "Variations on a Theme by Carl Maria von Weber." This recording from the 1960's must be heard to be believed. It will make you feel like the guy sitting in his easy chair with his hair blown back in the old ads for Maxell cassettes!

Could not find this on youtube or even Spotify, but if you search for "Kondrashin" on Amazon, this album cover will be first or second in line and you can stream it there. It's begins with track 58, so do scroll down. Unmissable!

Wallingford
Posts: 4665
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 3:31 pm
Location: Brush, Colorado

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Wallingford » Wed Jun 02, 2021 3:44 pm

Tchaikovsky's Souvenir de Florence (Kurtz)
Stravinsky's Jeu de cartes (Delogu)
Schumann's 'Rhenish'......led by Dean Dixon, the recording that endeared this work to me
Francis Plante, a 78-era pianist, doing a few Mendelssohn Songs Without Words
Beethoven's Fourth Piano Concerto.....Gulda, live w/Wiener Symphoniker (plays & conducts)
Good music is that which falls upon the ear with ease, and quits the memory with difficulty.
--Sir Thomas Beecham

jserraglio
Posts: 7938
Joined: Sun May 29, 2005 7:06 am
Location: Cleveland, Ohio

Re: What I listened to today

Post by jserraglio » Sat Jun 05, 2021 8:48 am

Reimann: King Lear
Saraste/Bavarian State Opera 2021
video
https://www.operlive.de/player/player_o ... fault.html

Rach3
Posts: 3695
Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2018 9:17 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Sat Jun 05, 2021 5:33 pm

Music of Gabriel Dupont:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CFepzzOcRk0 Poeme pour piano et quatour a cordes ( 1911)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qeQG1krY8UI Les heures dolentes ( 1903-05 ) for solo piano.

Rach3
Posts: 3695
Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2018 9:17 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Sun Jun 06, 2021 9:39 am

Solo piano works of Arthur Lourie :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_KHCl3_d1c ( Phoenix Park Nocturne )

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4-mIU40Z0gM ( Gigue )

Rach3
Posts: 3695
Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2018 9:17 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Mon Jun 07, 2021 8:53 am

Pianist Roberto Szidon , my cd , now at YT, plays Villa-Lobos " Cirandas ". A refreshing break, suggest listening over 2 sessions.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dop78ae ... rtyVSLAKeK

Wallingford
Posts: 4665
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 3:31 pm
Location: Brush, Colorado

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Wallingford » Mon Jun 07, 2021 11:40 am

Another LP side's worth of Columbia's old complete Webern set of the 50s:

5 Sacred Songs, Op.15
5 Canons, Op.16
3 Traditional Rhymes, Op.17
3 Songs, Op.18
2 Songs, Op.19
Trio, Op.20
Good music is that which falls upon the ear with ease, and quits the memory with difficulty.
--Sir Thomas Beecham

maestrob
Posts: 11306
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 11:30 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Mon Jun 07, 2021 1:06 pm

Rach3 wrote:
Sat Jun 05, 2021 5:33 pm
Music of Gabriel Dupont:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CFepzzOcRk0 Poeme pour piano et quatour a cordes ( 1911)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qeQG1krY8UI Les heures dolentes ( 1903-05 ) for solo piano.
Richly recorded, the Poeme pour piano et quatour a cordes from 1911 is a marvelous work by a composer I had not heard before. His story is tragic, and I mourn the loss of much fine music because of his untimely demise. He wrote just enough symphonic music to fit on one CD. Here's the cover. It can be purchased on Amazon or Presto, unlike the chamber music above, which is now OOP.

Many thanks, Rach3, for bringing this excellent music to our attention!

Image

Rach3
Posts: 3695
Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2018 9:17 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Wed Jun 09, 2021 2:55 pm

From WQXR radio, "Carnegie Hall Live - At the Keyboard" , lives from the past 10 years:

Argerich in 2017 playing the Prokofieff 3rd Piano Concerto with Antonio Papanno and the Santa Cecilia Orchestra, and then as an encore a piano 4-hands duet with Papanno of a selection from Ravel's "Mother Goose" Suite.

Schiff playing the complete Brahms Op.116, date not given, and speaking about his Bosendorfer and audiences.

Uchida playing the Beethoven 4th Piano Concerto with the late Mariss Jansons and the Bavarian State Orchestra, date not given.

Yuja Wang playing the Fugue from Beethoven's " Hammerklavier " Sonata in 2016 (!). Her program that evening was the four Brahms Ballades,Op.10, Schumann's " Kreisleriana ", the Beethoven, and 5 encores.

https://www.wqxr.org/story/carnegie-hal ... -keyboard/

maestrob
Posts: 11306
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 11:30 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Thu Jun 10, 2021 10:03 am

Rach3 wrote:
Wed Jun 09, 2021 2:55 pm
From WQXR radio, "Carnegie Hall Live - At the Keyboard" , lives from the past 10 years:

Argerich in 2017 playing the Prokofieff 3rd Piano Concerto with Antonio Papanno and the Santa Cecilia Orchestra, and then as an encore a piano 4-hands duet with Papanno of a selection from Ravel's "Mother Goose" Suite.

Schiff playing the complete Brahms Op.116, date not given, and speaking about his Bosendorfer and audiences.

Uchida playing the Beethoven 4th Piano Concerto with the late Mariss Jansons and the Bavarian State Orchestra, date not given.

Yuja Wang playing the Fugue from Beethoven's " Hammerklavier " Sonata in 2016 (!). Her program that evening was the four Brahms Ballades,Op.10, Schumann's " Kreisleriana ", the Beethoven, and 5 encores.

https://www.wqxr.org/story/carnegie-hal ... -keyboard/
What a great find, Steve, thank-you. I'll be exploring these today with great pleasure!

LATER: Argerich/Pappano in the Prokofiev III were electrifying, but their Ravel encore sounded like they were just a bit over-energized by the enthusiasm of the audience, and they played it a bit too fast, losing some notes in the process. Can't blame them, though, for getting a bit carried away! Uchida/Sanderling in Beethoven IV were also wonderful, but I'm not sure I appreciated sanderling's aggressive approach to the abrupt and rather dry chords in the orchestral introduction to the middle movement. All-in-all a very satisfying performance, however.

The disappointment for me was Schiff's Brahms. As in his Schubert, I find him just a bit awkward. He doesn't seem quite able to connect to the flow of Brahms, unlike, say, Perahia, Richter, Rubinstein or even Van Cliburn, to name a few examples. It's this same awkwardness that's making me hesitate about purchasing his new recording of the two concerti on a period instrument.

This was an excellent find, and much appreciated.

Rach3
Posts: 3695
Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2018 9:17 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Thu Jun 10, 2021 5:46 pm

Adrein-Francois Servais ( 1807 -1866) , Cello Concerto No.1.

Interesting in that it’s a very Paganini-like , violin-like cello concerto:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQHXVLMNa1c

Didier Poskin, cello
KBS Symphony Orchestra
Patrick Davin, conductor

Per the YT poster :

Servais was originally trained as a violinist before switching to the cello. Known by his contemporaries for his virtuosity and excessive vibrato, he was given the gift of a Stradivarius cello from 1701, which today bears his name. He is also known as the first cellist to adopt the bassists' use of an endpin because of the large size of his Stradivarius. (The use of the endpin was, however, not generally adopted by most cellists until the early 20th century. For instance, Carlo Alfredo Piatti never used an endpin.) He composed numerous works for his instrument, including four concerti and nearly twenty duos for two cellos or for cello and violin. Hector Berlioz later referred to Servais as "the Niccolò Paganini of the cello".

Rach3
Posts: 3695
Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2018 9:17 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Fri Jun 11, 2021 11:16 am

Rach3 wrote:
Thu Jun 10, 2021 5:46 pm
Adrein-Francois Servais ( 1807 -1866) , Cello Concerto No.1.

Interesting in that it’s a very Paganini-like , violin-like cello concerto:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQHXVLMNa1c

And another even more attractive, rare cello concerto:

Juro Tkalčić ( 1877-1957 ) : Cello Concerto in A minor, Op. 10

Very nice, very spirited, musically interesting first mov.cadenza leads attaca into a fine slow mov. Apparently composed in 1922 (!). Liked it well enough to search for a recording, but have not found one yet.

Branimir Pustički, cello
Croatian Radio-Television Symphony Orchestra
Robert Homen, conductor

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ugpkXIDRluI

Per the YT poster :

Juro Tkalčić was a Croatian cellist and composer. After studing cello in Zagreb, he left in 1895 and began playing in various orchestras and chamber ensembles all over Europe. Beginning in 1900 he lived in Paris, where he earned a reputation as a top chamber musician. In 1920 he returned home and became a professor at the Zagreb Conservatory. He left several compositions in a rich Romantic style, including a string quartet, a cello concerto and many salon compositions, often using Croatian folk idioms.

Wallingford
Posts: 4665
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 3:31 pm
Location: Brush, Colorado

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Wallingford » Fri Jun 11, 2021 11:07 pm

Good music is that which falls upon the ear with ease, and quits the memory with difficulty.
--Sir Thomas Beecham

Wallingford
Posts: 4665
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 3:31 pm
Location: Brush, Colorado

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Wallingford » Fri Jun 11, 2021 11:20 pm

Here's the original album I had:
https://www.discogs.com/Golden-Orchestr ... se/9692003

The version in the above post eliminates several songs, and cuts verses out of others.
Good music is that which falls upon the ear with ease, and quits the memory with difficulty.
--Sir Thomas Beecham

Rach3
Posts: 3695
Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2018 9:17 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Sat Jun 12, 2021 11:08 am

Albert Roussel’s very attractive 16-minute Piano Concerto, Op.36 ( 1927 ), written just 10 years before this death,Alain Raes, pianist, with Orchestre de Douai-Region Hauts -de-France under Jean-Jacques Kantorow.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Utr6VL-kRcY

I have a Brilliant Classics 2-cd set of his solo piano music, which music I adore, Emanuele Torquati, pianist , and have a recording of this PC with different artists in a wonderful 2-cd Vox Box, “French Piano Concertos” . I can recommend highly both cd sets.

A track from the Brilliant cd : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XjJ5qCewSv0

maestrob
Posts: 11306
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 11:30 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Sat Jun 12, 2021 1:11 pm

Rach3 wrote:
Fri Jun 11, 2021 11:16 am
Rach3 wrote:
Thu Jun 10, 2021 5:46 pm
Adrein-Francois Servais ( 1807 -1866) , Cello Concerto No.1.

Interesting in that it’s a very Paganini-like , violin-like cello concerto:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQHXVLMNa1c

And another even more attractive, rare cello concerto:

Juro Tkalčić ( 1877-1957 ) : Cello Concerto in A minor, Op. 10

Very nice, very spirited, musically interesting first mov.cadenza leads attaca into a fine slow mov. Apparently composed in 1922 (!). Liked it well enough to search for a recording, but have not found one yet.

Branimir Pustički, cello
Croatian Radio-Television Symphony Orchestra
Robert Homen, conductor

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ugpkXIDRluI

Per the YT poster :

Juro Tkalčić was a Croatian cellist and composer. After studying cello in Zagreb, he left in 1895 and began playing in various orchestras and chamber ensembles all over Europe. Beginning in 1900 he lived in Paris, where he earned a reputation as a top chamber musician. In 1920 he returned home and became a professor at the Zagreb Conservatory. He left several compositions in a rich Romantic style, including a string quartet, a cello concerto and many salon compositions, often using Croatian folk idioms.
Both of these links led to excellent music that I had not heard before. many thanks, Steve!

The Tkalcic of course had more substance and thus appealed to me more, and it was followed by a concerto by Klegel which was also unfamiliar and quite interesting. Not sure of I need these on CDs, but I'm certainly glad I heard them all.

Your continued generosity in your interesting music posts is greatly appreciated. 8)

Wallingford
Posts: 4665
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 3:31 pm
Location: Brush, Colorado

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Wallingford » Tue Jun 15, 2021 8:24 pm

St-Saens' 'Organ' Symphony (Toscanini)
Hungerford doing some of Beethoven's early--WoO--piano pieces
Good music is that which falls upon the ear with ease, and quits the memory with difficulty.
--Sir Thomas Beecham

maestrob
Posts: 11306
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 11:30 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Wed Jun 16, 2021 8:29 am

Rach3 wrote:
Sat Jun 12, 2021 11:08 am
Albert Roussel’s very attractive 16-minute Piano Concerto, Op.36 ( 1927 ), written just 10 years before this death,Alain Raes, pianist, with Orchestre de Douai-Region Hauts -de-France under Jean-Jacques Kantorow.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Utr6VL-kRcY

I have a Brilliant Classics 2-cd set of his solo piano music, which music I adore, Emanuele Torquati, pianist , and have a recording of this PC with different artists in a wonderful 2-cd Vox Box, “French Piano Concertos” . I can recommend highly both cd sets.

A track from the Brilliant cd : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XjJ5qCewSv0
Thanks much!

Agree the Vox Box of French Piano Concertos is full of rare and wonderful titles.

Here's the cover, as it's still available:

Image

Also, I found this 12CD box from Brilliant, which can be streamed on Amazon for free if you're a Prime member in its entirety:

Image

Image

And while we're on the subject, here's an interesting CD rated five stars that can also be streamed for free there, that includes Robert Casadesus's rarely done piano concerto:

Image

Image

All the above will come up if you search for "French Piano Concertos."

Wallingford
Posts: 4665
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2003 3:31 pm
Location: Brush, Colorado

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Wallingford » Fri Jun 18, 2021 8:39 pm

Good music is that which falls upon the ear with ease, and quits the memory with difficulty.
--Sir Thomas Beecham

maestrob
Posts: 11306
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 11:30 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Sat Jun 19, 2021 12:09 pm

Image

This wonderful recording of chamber music by Samuel Coleridge-Taylor played by the Catalyst Quartet with the well-known Metropolitan Opera Orchestra clarinetist Anthony McGill, features his Op. ! Piano Quintet, Op. 5 Fantasiestucke for String Quartet, and his Op. 10 Clarinet quintet, all early, European derivative works. I could not find a hard copy of the CD on Amazon or Presto, as it seems to be available for download only, but I plan to keep looking. Just released in February of this year, this is a warm and exquisitely detailed recording with just the right amount of ambience. A marvelous project, well worth seeking out. Five stars.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kQis_87oZWs

Rach3
Posts: 3695
Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2018 9:17 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Mon Jun 21, 2021 9:16 am

Pianist Steven Osborne live at Wigmore Hall June 21. If you are in a mood for Debussy solo piano, some familiar, some not :

Debussy: Ballade slave
Debussy: Suite Bergamasque
Debussy: Two Arabesques
Debussy: Images oubliées
Debussy: La plus que lente
Debussy: Elegie
Debussy: Pièce pour le vêtement du blesse
Debussy: Les soirs illuminés par l'ardeur du charbon

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000x6m3

Rach3
Posts: 3695
Joined: Tue Apr 03, 2018 9:17 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by Rach3 » Wed Jun 23, 2021 4:45 pm

Pianist Minoru Nojima’s “Feux follets “ ( Liszt TE # 5 ) . !!!

And,yes, I've heard the 1958 Richters.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=735-SvtTHuk

maestrob
Posts: 11306
Joined: Tue Sep 16, 2008 11:30 am

Re: What I listened to today

Post by maestrob » Thu Jun 24, 2021 11:21 am

Rach3 wrote:
Wed Jun 23, 2021 4:45 pm
Pianist Minoru Nojima’s “Feux follets “ ( Liszt TE # 5 ) . !!!

And,yes, I've heard the 1958 Richters.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=735-SvtTHuk
Yes, I do have that CD on my shelves, and your post has prompted me to play it for the first time this year. Thanks for the reminder! 😉

He apparently was quite put off by the studio recording process and never made another disc after his Liszt and Ravel releases. A great loss to all of us. The Ravel can be streamed on Amazon, but not the Liszt. Both are available on Spotify.

Image

Image

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 50 guests